What in the World Is Going On Around the Country

Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on facebook
Share on linkedin

What in the World Is Going On Around the Country

SHARE:

Share on email
Share on twitter
Share on facebook
Share on linkedin

Does anyone remember what it was like when the rental industry wasn’t constantly changing? No? It’s been a stressful handful of years now and it seems each time we turn around there’s new eviction restrictions or laws. Recent events have affected the country in different ways across the country, with a wide disparity on how states are reacting and paving the way to move forward. Here’s a few examples of how different places across the country are faring post-moratorium.

Texas

Does anyone remember what it was like when the rental industry wasn’t constantly changing? No? It’s been a stressful handful of years now and it seems each time we turn around there’s new eviction restrictions or laws. Recent events have affected the country in different ways across the country, with a wide disparity on how states are reacting and paving the way to move forward. Here’s a few examples of how different places across the country are faring post-moratorium.

Texas

While Texas has been making waves in the recent weeks, it’s not over their excitement for the new freedom regarding evictions. In fact, the moratorium wasn’t used by many Texans in the first place. In Harris County, Texas, it was found about 16% of evictions “were protected by the CDC” but only 4% had attorneys to help them in the matter and therefore “did not stop evictions generally.”  It was found that while Harris County had about 25,000 eviction cases between September to July, the evictions ban only helped about 3,300, and now around 2,400 of those may be forced from their current dwelling.  Unlike Philadelphia, Texas isn’t going to face much friction when it comes to moving forward with evictions after the moratorium.

While Texas has been making waves in the recent weeks, it’s not over their excitement for the new freedom regarding evictions. In fact, the moratorium wasn’t used by many Texans in the first place. In Harris County, Texas, it was found about 16% of evictions “were protected by the CDC” but only 4% had attorneys to help them in the matter and therefore “did not stop evictions generally.”  It was found that while Harris County had about 25,000 eviction cases between September to July, the evictions ban only helped about 3,300, and now around 2,400 of those may be forced from their current dwelling.  Unlike Philadelphia, Texas isn’t going to face much friction when it comes to moving forward with evictions after the moratorium.

Arkansas

Arkansas is ready to move forward with allowing evictions and they have been for a while. Last year alone, around three thousand households were up against the great big E-Word in between April and December. In the state, there are rental assistance programs available to those who were financially affected by COVID-19 which should be designed to further aid those in need, including the “Arkansas Fresh Start” Program. In addition, there are a few programs designed for specific county-dwelling tenants, such as the Community Development Block Grant Coronavirus Response for Fort Smith residents.

Arkansas

Arkansas is ready to move forward with allowing evictions and they have been for a while. Last year alone, around three thousand households were up against the great big E-Word in between April and December. In the state, there are rental assistance programs available to those who were financially affected by COVID-19 which should be designed to further aid those in need, including the “Arkansas Fresh Start” Program. In addition, there are a few programs designed for specific county-dwelling tenants, such as the Community Development Block Grant Coronavirus Response for Fort Smith residents.

Philadelphia

The city of Philadelphia had “historically low levels of evictions” during the 2020 pandemic. This may be in part due to the Philadelphia Eviction Diversion Program created in the summer of last year that passed without a single naysayer. It temporarily waived late fees and created a nine-month payment plan for past due rent. However, when it comes to evictions, it also created a middle step. Before going to court to file, the program required landlords to “apply for rental assistance and go through the diversion program before filing.”

Philadelphia

The city of Philadelphia had “historically low levels of evictions” during the 2020 pandemic. This may be in part due to the Philadelphia Eviction Diversion Program created in the summer of last year that passed without a single naysayer. It temporarily waived late fees and created a nine-month payment plan for past due rent. However, when it comes to evictions, it also created a middle step. Before going to court to file, the program required landlords to “apply for rental assistance and go through the diversion program before filing.”

This program was lauded even by the U.S. Department of Justice, which wrote in an open letter asking other places to create similar programs, “Early indications from Philadelphia showed that its program had helped reduce caseloads as significant numbers of litigants have chosen to resolve their disputes through mediation.”

On the bright side, it does seem like the country is fully prepared to move forward. Even though some places seem to have completely opposing views with how to move on, some choosing to hold on to eviction bans and others plowing right through them, the baby steps are at least taking us somewhere. It’s hard to plan ahead, but at least it’s not impossible.

This program was lauded even by the U.S. Department of Justice, which wrote in an open letter asking other places to create similar programs, “Early indications from Philadelphia showed that its program had helped reduce caseloads as significant numbers of litigants have chosen to resolve their disputes through mediation.”

On the bright side, it does seem like the country is fully prepared to move forward. Even though some places seem to have completely opposing views with how to move on, some choosing to hold on to eviction bans and others plowing right through them, the baby steps are at least taking us somewhere. It’s hard to plan ahead, but at least it’s not impossible.

Subscribe!

31 questions to ask rental applicants

Categories

Subscribe for more news and tips!

Share with your friends!

Share on facebook
Share on Facebook
Share on twitter
Share on Twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on Linkdin
Share on email
Share via Email

More Articles from ApplyConnect

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Share this Article!

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

More Articles from ApplyConnect

Blog Topics

Click the dropdown

Get Started with ApplyConnect!

The nation’s most trusted tenant screening for real estate agents, landlords, and property managers. No cost background checks available 24/7.

©2018 ApplyConnect. All rights reserved

ApplyConnect marks used herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of applyconnect.com. Other product and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.

Get Started with ApplyConnect!

The nation’s most trusted tenant screening for real estate agents, landlords, and property managers. No cost background checks available 24/7.

©2018 ApplyConnect. All rights reserved

ApplyConnect marks used herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of applyconnect.com. Other product and company names mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.